A Quick Glance at Attributed Surveys

What is an attributed survey? Unlike anonymous surveys, there’s a connection to respondents.  Since certain contact and demographic data is provided, it makes it easier connect participants to their survey responses. Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of attributed surveys: Pros You…

A Quick Glance at Anonymous Surveys

What is an anonymous survey? This type of surveys has no connection to its participants.  Neither e-mail addresses nor personal information is collected; therefore, survey responses can’t be traced back to the respondents. Let’s take a look at the pros and cons of anonymous surveys:…

Your Survey’s Magic Number: Calculating the Right Sample Size

Over the past weeks, I’ve covered a good number of survey question mistakes to avoid.  I hope that these articles help you during the survey design process. Once that is taken care of, consider calculating your sample size.  I want to walk you through the…

A Survey Faux Pas: An Excess of Open-Ended Questions

I’ve always associated open-ended questions with a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it can give you unique and useful insights.  Survey respondents get a chance to express their opinions and expand on their thought process. On the other hand, it can cause participants to…

A Survey Faux Pas: Multiple Choice Blunder

I can’t emphasize enough about the importance of survey design.  An optimized survey question is capable of delivering precise data and valuable insights for business growth. In previous entries, I’ve addressed common survey question mistakes.  These slips can severely weaken the purpose of your survey….

A Survey Faux Pas: Absolute Question

In the last couple of weeks, I’ve gone over examples of frequent survey question mistakes. Having covered both the loaded and double-barreled questions, let’s take a look at what is known as the absolute question. Here’s an example: Do you ever drink coffee in the…

A Survey Faux Pas: Loaded Question

As I mentioned on last week’s post, precise questions are integral to the survey design process. Let’s take a look at the loaded question.  This is the type of survey question that already comes with an assumption. Here’s an example: What is your favorite football…

A Survey Faux Pas: Double-Barreled Question

An integral part of the survey design process is to write precise questions. A double-barreled question is the opposite, this happens when different topics are grouped on a single survey question. For example, let’s go over the following survey question: How reliable is your current…